Amber Callan | Spoken Words vs Sung Words with Respect to Recall
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DATE OF PROJECT: AUGUST 2014 – DECEMBER 2014
CLASS: RESEARCH METHODS

During my Research Methods class, we were required to run experiments from IRB approval to data analysis. In a team, we decided to run a study to examines the difference between hearing spoken words and sung words with regards to the recall of these word lists. In the following study, participants listened to a word list of twenty words either sung or spoken and then performed an intermittent task. Following the task, they completed a free recall and were graded on accuracy to see if one had a statistically significantly higher recall.

Results of the experiment showed that participants that heard the word list spoken (35) had a higher percentage of accuracy in recall than those that heard the word list sung (27). There was not a significant main effect or a significant interaction between gender on recall. Therefore when trying to remember a set of words, it may be best to hear them spoken without a melody. This could have future implications for teaching practices and study methods.

PSYC 340 Poster